2 comments on “Join the NRA, or get off of this website.

  1. Renewed mine and my wife’s, took an online class, bought a couple of hats and a new range bag, and sent a little donation as well. Support the NRA!

    Like

  2. The NRA has been pretty good lately, but…

    * In the 1920s, the National Revolver Association, the arm of the NRA
    responsible for handgun training, proposed regulations later adopted by
    nine states, requiring a permit to carry a concealed weapon, five years
    additional prison time if the gun was used in a crime, a ban on gun
    sales to non-citizens, a one day waiting period between the purchase and
    receipt of a gun, and that records of gun sales be made available to
    police.

    * The 1930s crime spree of the Prohibition era prompted President Franklin
    Roosevelt to make gun control a feature of the New Deal. The NRA
    assisted Roosevelt in drafting the 1934 National Firearms Act and the
    1938 Gun Control Act, the first federal gun control laws. Not only was the legislation unanimously upheld by the Supreme Court in
    1939, but Karl T. Frederick, the president of the NRA, testified before
    Congress stating, “I have never believed in the general practice of
    carrying weapons. I do not believe in the general promiscuous toting of
    guns. I think it should be sharply restricted and only under licenses.”

    * On Nov. 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated by Lee
    Harvey Oswald. He shot the president with an Italian military surplus
    rifle purchased from a NRA mail-order advertisement. NRA Executive
    Vice-President Franklin Orth agreed at a congressional hearing that
    mail-order sales should be banned stating, “We do think that any sane
    American, who calls himself an American, can object to placing into this
    bill the instrument which killed the president of the United States.”

    * The NRA also supported California’s Mulford Act of 1967, which had
    banned carrying loaded weapons in public in response to the Black
    Panther Party’s impromptu march on the State Capitol to protest gun
    control legislation on May 2, 1967.

    * For much of the 20th century, the NRA had lobbied and co-authored
    legislation that was similar to the modern legislative measures the
    association now characterizes as unconstitutional. But by the 1970s the
    NRA came to view attempts to enact gun-control laws as threats to the
    Second Amendment.

    Like

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